Statement: Daisuke Yokota

Taratine

 

Searching back through the fog of memory, I see myself as a young boy, not yet ten. Guided by my brother’s outstretched hand, I’m drawn toward the din of our housing project’s summer festival. The sun’s rays bounce hot off the pavement from its apex in the noontime sky, but the insistent boom of the taiko drum cascades off the city walls undeterred, over the heads of the brimming throng of revelers, their cries drowned out by the ear-piercing deathsong of the cicadas.

 

Clutching the coins entrusted to our small palms, my brother and I approach the snaking row of wooden stalls set up by the festival food vendors. He buys yakitori and yakisoba for the dinner table. With the leftover change, I buy my favorite, candy apple. Having enjoyed the festivities, we leave for home, where mother will be awaiting our return.

 

Racing up the staircase, we reach the narrow landing leading to our apartment door. A chill air hangs still, trapped by the grey concrete walls.

 

My brother tries the doorknob, but finding it locked, stands on his toes to ring the bell. I press my ear to the cold metal door, but do not hear the usual sound of my mother’s swift footsteps, always quick to welcome us home.

 

Helpless, we retreat, and resign ourselves to waiting patiently on the steps, sure that our mother will not be long to return.

 

I remember the heat that day, hotter than ever before.

 

The half-eaten candy apple clutched between my fingertips liquifies in my saliva and the thick, choking humidity, in turn releasing streams of its sticky, sugary sweetness. Oozing down my wrist as a slug slides languorously across soft, pudgy flesh, the gel stops just short of my elbow, pulled into a fine gossamer thread as it trickles to the ground. Pooling at my feet, I watch spellbound as the syrupy orb glistens brilliantly in the waning sun.

 

Decades later, muggy summer days never fail to transport me back to this scene from my childhood. In the intervening years, I’ve grown into a man, one big enough to open the door and wash his own hands without waiting for the help of his mother. Yet scrub as I might, to this day I haven’t been able to loosen that sickly sweet, sticky sensation’s grip from memory.

 

Daisuke Yokota

(Translation/Daniel Gonzalez)

 

 

 

 

垂乳根

 

遠い記憶の、おそらく私が10歳にも満たない時のこと。

 

私は兄に連れられて団地の夏祭りへと向かった。

午後も少し過ぎ、陽が真上から照りつける厳しい暑さだったけれど、外は多くの人であふれ、町中に響く太鼓の音と、死期の近づいた蝉の鳴き声が、耳をさす様に辺りをおおっていた。

 

一通り祭りを楽しんでから、兄は母に頼まれた焼き鳥や焼きそばを買い、私は大好きなりんご飴を買って母の待つ家へ帰る事にした。小走りに階段を上がり玄関前のコンクリートに囲まれた小さな空間に入ると、そこにはまだひんやりとした空気が残っていた。

 

兄は一度ドアノブを回し、扉が閉まっている事を確認してから、呼び鈴をならした。いつもならすぐに早足でこちらに向かってくる母の足音が、扉の向こうから聞こえてくる事はなかった。兄と私はどうする事も出来ずに、母はすぐに帰るだろうと家の前で待つ事にした。

 

その日はいつにも増して暑かった事を覚えている。

 

幼い私の持つ食べかけのりんご飴は、私の唾液と、息を吸うのも不快なむせ返りそうな程の湿度のせいで、だらだらと私の指先から手首へとナメクジが肌を這う様に垂れていった。それは肘に達する手前の腕の腹から、糸を引きながら地面へと滴り、傾き始めた陽の照らす足下で、丸く膨みを保ちながらきらきらと光っていた。

 

数十年が経った今でも、私はこの時の光景を蒸し暑い夏の日に思い出す。

 

今では、母を待たずに自分で家の扉を開けその手を洗う事が出来る位には大きくなった。けれど、私の記憶に染み付いてしまった、その甘ったるいべとべととした感触はいつまでもとれないでいる。

 

横田大輔